Wednesday, July 31, 2019

Multiple passwords with geli (on root)

As described in the man page, geli supports two slots for passphrases and/or keyfiles that can be used to decrypt the disk. By default, both of these slots are identical, using the passphrase provided at init. However, they can be set separately. We are using this feature to keep a "backup" passphrase on the encrypted zroot of a host. In theory, this allows us to walk remote hands through unlocking the disk, if we're not on-site, without disclosing the master passphrase. The backup passphrase could then be reset, restoring security.

In the case of geli-on-root configurations, the vintage of the installation determines the correct way to (re)set a passphrase. FreeBSD sysinstall on versions prior to 12.0 created an unencrypted boot partition, and utilize a keyfile in addition to a passphrase. Versions 12.0 and later just use a passphrase.

root@host: cat /boot/loader.conf
geli_ada1p4_keyfile0_load="YES"
geli_ada1p4_keyfile0_type="ada1p4:geli_keyfile0"
geli_ada1p4_keyfile0_name="/boot/encryption.key"
geli_ada2p4_keyfile0_load="YES"
geli_ada2p4_keyfile0_type="ada2p4:geli_keyfile0"
geli_ada2p4_keyfile0_name="/boot/encryption.key"


The newer style does not typically have the above parameters. Before changing a passphrase, verify that the disks you are going to operate on are the correct disks. For example, in the case of a zfs-on-root setup:

root@host: zpool status zroot
  pool: zroot
 state: ONLINE
  scan: resilvered 31.5G in 0 days 00:13:54 with 0 errors on Wed Jul 10 09:57:10 2019
config:

        NAME            STATE     READ WRITE CKSUM
        zroot           ONLINE       0     0     0
          mirror-0      ONLINE       0     0     0
            ada2p4.eli  ONLINE       0     0     0
            ada1p4.eli  ONLINE       0     0     0

errors: No known data errors


Once you have determined which style the host is configured with, you can reset the password. The only difference between the two is that for the older style you need to provide the keyfile argument (-K):

root@host: geli setkey -n 1 -K /boot/encryption.key ada1p4
Enter new passphrase:
Reenter new passphrase:
Note, that the master key encrypted with old keys and/or passphrase may still exists in a metadata backup file.


If you are using a mirrored root, don't forget to update the passphrase on the second disk.

root@host: geli setkey -n 1 -K /boot/encryption.key ada2p4
Enter new passphrase:
Reenter new passphrase:
Note, that the master key encrypted with old keys and/or passphrase may still exists in a metadata backup file.


Newer style setups can simply omit the passphrase directive.

root@host: geli setkey -n 1 ada1p4
Enter new passphrase:
Reenter new passphrase:
Note, that the master key encrypted with old keys and/or passphrase may still exists in a metadata backup file.


If using two different passphrases, you can verify this by rebooting the host and trying each one. Disclaimer: I tested this using a throw-away virtual machine. I recommend testing this before trying it on your real data! Don't trust your data to something that you just copy-paste from the Internet!

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